How to Provide Helpful Feedback to Your Web Designer - iNNOV8 Place
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How to Provide Helpful Feedback to Your Web Designer

Helpful feedback for web designer

How to Provide Helpful Feedback to Your Web Designer

It’s happening! You’ve started the process of building either your first website or revamping your current one. You did all the research and you found a web designer that suits your needs and now you eagerly await updates from them. But what if you need to tell them to change something? How do you make sure that you provide helpful feedback to your web designer so that you what you want is clear? As seasoned web developers, we know what we need from each of our clients to exceed their expectations so we’d figure we could share that with you.

What kind of website is it?

This is an important question to answer for designers at the beginning of building your website. This gives them an idea of what sort of functionality needs to be present on the site. Giving feedback about who your target audience is, the purpose of the site, and what you want users to do on the site is important so that designers can have a clear idea of what they need to do to make your site successful. It’s always better to be thorough, clear, and communicative. It’s hard to work off assumptions and it usually leads to difficulties as the project goes on.

Review pages as your audience would

This one can be kind of tricky! When it comes time to review the pages you might find yourself looking at the smaller details rather than the bigger picture. Yes, please tell your designer if a logo needs to be moved or, if the content is wrong, it needs to be fixed! But it’s also important that you go over the website as your user would. That way you can catch any errors in website function or if the flow of the site doesn’t work. Your user won’t know that a page isn’t lively enough but they will know if the site is confusing to navigate. Looking at the website from two different perspectives is the trick to cohesiveness.

Be collaborative!

This project is as much the designers’ as it yours. Bring your expertise to the table! You know more about your audience and your goal for the website. Contribute as much as you can. This can be done by supplying pictures and media to go on the site or even examples to other sites you like. Be as prompt as you can when sending your feedback because, without your approval, development can grind to a halt!

 

Much like those group projects we had in school, the final product is always better when everyone contributes the best of what they offer to the team. Treat your web design team the same, as you are all working towards the same goal. When everyone puts in their best efforts that’s going be reflective in the site and it’s something that users will definitely notice.

 

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